The power of hemp

We want to share our heavenly, healthy hemp tea with the world. But our mission is bigger than that: to make everyone rediscover the power of hemp!

Dutch Harvest founder Esther Molenwijk used to work in the field of sustainability. In her search for sustainable, local resources to she came across the hemp plant as an excellent alternative for many non-sustainable resources. Hemp could provide for building materials, textiles and its seeds are an excellent source of plant-based protein. Esther got fascinated by the plant and she did research around Europe with one single question: how can we get this sustainable power plant back in business?

At a hemp harvest, she found out that the leaves and flowers of the hemp plant were not being used. When she dried them, they turned out to make a lovely, mild tea. Also, she found out that the flowers of fiber hemp contain the healthy compound CBD. Being a tea enthousiast herself, the idea was born quickly: to introduce hemp tea as a tasty way to rediscover the power of hemp.

On our packaging and in all our communication, we tell the story of this beautiful plant. Hereby, we spread our hemp mission with every pack of tea!

The power of hemp and its many applications

Hemp in ancient times

Hemp history ancient use in many cultures

For thousands of years, the hemp plant has been an important resource for various populations around the world. The plant is often referred to as ‘the fuel of pre-industrial societies’. It is known, for instance, that in Siberia hemp was used 5000 years ago for food and for textile. In China, the power of hemp was used in tradicional medicine.

Dutch Hemp History

Ship with hemp sails and hemp ropes in the Netherlands

In the Netherlands hemp was particularly important in the 17th century. At that time, over 2000 Duch ships sailed the seas, each using between 50 and 100 tonnes of hemp. The plant’s fibers were not only used to make strong ropes, but also to weave the sails. However, the rise of steam navigation, as well as the labour-intensive production process of hemp, heralded a decline in hemp at the end of the 18th century.

Hemp prohibition in the ’30’s

Hemp farmer in front of a hemp field

In the 1930s, hemp seemed to be making a comeback. A new machine was developed, that would ease the production process.

Expectantly, the newspapers described hemp as ‘the billion dollar crop’.

 

Then, however, an active lobby from the plastics industry, the timper trade and the cheap textiles trade arose in the United States.

By associating hemp with the ‘marijuana’ cigarettes smoked by jazz musicians, they were able to label the crop as a ‘dangerous drug’. As a result, the government banned all uses of hemp. Nowadays, a clear distinction is being made between ‘fibre hemp’ and ‘recreational hemp’ or marijuana, and farmers in most countries are once again allowed to cultivate hemp.

Hemp House in the Netherlands

At the end of 2018, hemp grower and processor Dun Agro built a complete house out of hemp. The walls, the ceiling and the roof were made from hemp. A sustainable and healthy house made from a local resource. Extra interesting is the fact that a hemp building has an extremely high earth quake resistance. Especially relevant in the North of the Netherlands, which is also where the hemp grows. In this area earth quakes are an actual threat, as a result of extensive gass drillings. Watch the movie below to learn about the hemp building process.

Indestructible hemp clothing

Hempje hemp clothing Claren Savi

Hemp grows faster than cotton, it doesn’t need any pesticides and it can be grown locally. Hemp fibres are incredibly strong, water absorbend

and hypoallergenic. Wouldn’t it be great if more clothing brands used hemp? Clarent Savi has already discovered the power of hemp. With his clothing brand ‘Hempje’, he is already setting a great example.

Hemp is a sustainable crop

  • Hemp doesn’t need any pesticides or herbicides. It easily outgrows the weeds.
  • Also, hemp can do with litte water. The occasional Dutch rain shower is enough. Because the plants have deep roots, they can gather water from deep down the soil.
  • Hemp is an extremely fast growing crop. It grows over 3 meters in 100 days.
  • Hemp absorbs a lot of CO2 per hectare.
  • Finally, hemp improve the structure of the soil due to its deep an finely branched roots.

Hemp Collective

Hemp Collective foundation aims to rediscover the power of hemp

A plant with such an important place in history, which is so good for the earth ánd that can offer resources for so many materials, could be of great use in times when we’re struggling with climate issues.

Hemp can help us make the transition from a fossil based to a bio-based economy. An economy in which we make clever use of what natures is offering us. In the Netherlands, there are currently two major hemp growers. However, the actual use of hemp raw materials still falls far short of its potential. For this reason, the Foundation Hemp Collective was founded: to get hemp back in business! Dutch Harvest is an active part of the Hemp Collective.

More info at www.hempcollective.nl (sorry, only in Dutch!)

Pure-hennepthee-hennepbloem-hennepblad-Dutch-Harvest
No high, but high in flavour

Our hemp contains the unique healthy compound CBD.

Werking CBD
Albert Dun en Esther Molenwijk in het hennepveld Dutch Harvest Dun Agro
From plant to cup

We are in charge of the entire process of making a delicious cup of hemp tea.

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Pure-hennepthee-hennepbloem-hennepblad-Dutch-Harvest
No high, but high in flavour

Our hemp contains the unique healthy compound CBD.

Albert Dun en Esther Molenwijk in het hennepveld Dutch Harvest Dun Agro
From plant to cup

We are in charge of the entire process of making a delicious cup of hemp tea.